HomeNewsBriefStriking Bahia Military Police Suspected of ‘Exterminations’
BRIEF

Striking Bahia Military Police Suspected of 'Exterminations'

BRAZIL / 14 FEB 2012 BY CHRISTOPHER LOOFT EN

A high-ranking police official in Brazil has said that 25 to 30 of the murders that took place in the city of Salvador during a military police strike may have been committed by striking officers.

O Globo reports that Arthur Gallas, director of the Bahia Homicide Department, said that some 45 of the 187 murders that took place during the strike had characteristics of "executions," with the victims handcuffed or bound and shot in the head.

The announcement follows the end of the police's strike in Bahia and of a separate strike in Rio, both over demands for higher wages.

InSight Crime Analysis

If some of the execution-style murders that took place during Bahia's police strike were committed by police, this would point to police involvement in paramilitary forces known as militias. This phenomenon is well-established in Rio de Janeiro, where militia groups made up of current and former security officials control entire neighborhoods. According to the Tribuna da Bahia, Salvador's police deny reports of militia activity.

Brazilian federal authorities launched an investigation into broadening networks of militias, including in Bahia, last year. Between reports of extortion by police-staffed militias and hints that police may be behind some of Bahia's murders, it may take more than a $350 a month pay raise to tackle Salvador's crime problem. A recent study showed a 370 percent increase in homicide in the city from 2000 to 2010.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

BRAZIL / 12 AUG 2011

Less than a week after approving a border security plan with Colombia, Brazil signaled that it would like…

ARGENTINA / 8 SEP 2016

In the heart of some of South America's biggest cities, local authorities have ceded control of drug slums to organized…

BRAZIL / 29 MAR 2018

In our March 29 Facebook Live session, Managing Editor Josefina Salomón and Senior Editor Mike LaSusa discussed recent developments in…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Unraveling the Web of Elites Connected to Organized Crime

27 JUL 2021

InSight Crime published Elites and Organized Crime in Nicaragua, a deep dive into the relationships between criminal actors and elites in that Central American nation.

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime’s Greater Focus on US-Mexico Border

20 JUL 2021

InSight Crime has decided to turn many of its investigative resources towards understanding and chronicling the criminal dynamics along the US-Mexico border.

THE ORGANIZATION

Key Arrests and Police Budget Increases Due to InSight Crime Investigations

8 JUL 2021

With Memo Fantasma’s arrest, InSight Crime has proven that our investigations can and will uncover major criminal threats in the Americas.

THE ORGANIZATION

Organized Crime’s Influence on Gender-Based Violence

30 JUN 2021

InSight Crime investigator Laura N. Ávila spoke on organized crime and gender-based violence at the launch of a research project by the United Nations Development Programme.

THE ORGANIZATION

Conversation with Paraguay Judicial Operators on PCC

24 JUN 2021

InSight Crime Co-director Steven Dudley formed part of a panel attended by over 500 students, all of whom work in Paraguay's judicial system.