HomeNewsBriefVeracruz, Mexico, Fires 980 Police in Corruption Purge
BRIEF

Veracruz, Mexico, Fires 980 Police in Corruption Purge

MEXICO / 20 OCT 2011 BY JEANNA CULLINAN EN

Authorities in the Gulf coast state of Veracruz, Mexico, announced that 980 state police have been dismissed in the last two weeks after failing tests designed to detect corruption.

State public security secretary, Arturo Bermudez Zurita, announced the figures, and said that of the approximately 9,000 members of the Veracruz State Police, approximately a third have undergone confidence testing thus far, reports El Universal.

The confidence tests are intended to root out corrupt and incompetent elements in the force, and include polygraph and drug tests, as well as aptitude, psychological and financial evaluations.

Zurita reiterated his commitment to reforming the state's police, and said that 479 fully trained and vetted cadets have graduated from the state academy and will soon be put in service. He also discussed policy changes designed to attract and retain more quality police in the state, including salary increases and medical services for family members.

Similar purges of police in the northern state of Nuevo Leon have left that region with a serious shortage of law enforcement, according to reports.

Veracruz has seen a string of disturbances in recent weeks, with President Felipe Calderon warning that the state had been left in the hands of the Zetas drug gang. Thirty-five corpses were abandoned on a city street in broad daylight in September, and federal forces sent to control the violence discovered dozens more bodies at multiple locations in the capital, linked to conflict between the Zetas drug gang and rival groups.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

BELTRAN LEYVA ORG / 19 DEC 2013

Federal authorities in Mexico said the case of 12 youths snatched from a bar in the capital and murdered was…

MEXICO / 27 JUL 2015

The seizure in Mexico of an advanced marijuana growing operation that used foreign expertise may indicate local growers are seeking to…

BRAZIL / 22 SEP 2011

Programs to rebuild the social fabric of troubled border city Juarez, one of the most violent in Mexico, can be…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Guatemala Social Insecurity Investigation Makes Front Page News

10 DEC 2021

InSight Crime’s latest investigation into a case of corruption within Guatemala's social security agency linked to the deaths of patients with kidney disease made waves in…

THE ORGANIZATION

Venezuela El Dorado Investigation Makes Headlines

3 DEC 2021

InSight Crime's investigation into the trafficking of illegal gold in Venezuela's Amazon region generated impact on both social media and in the press. Besides being republished and mentioned by several…

THE ORGANIZATION

Gender and Investigative Techniques Focus of Workshops

26 NOV 2021

On November 23-24, InSight Crime conducted a workshop called “How to Cover Organized Crime: Investigation Techniques and A Focus on Gender.” The session convened reporters and investigators from a dozen…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Names Two New Board Members

19 NOV 2021

In recent weeks, InSight Crime added two new members to its board. Joy Olson is the former executive director of the Washington Office on Latin America…

THE ORGANIZATION

Senate Commission in Paraguay Cites InSight Crime

12 NOV 2021

InSight Crime’s reporting and investigations often reach the desks of diplomats, security officials and politicians. The latest example occurred in late October during a commission of Paraguay's Senate that tackled…