HomeNewsBrazil's PCC Scared Rival Kingpin into Surrendering to Police
NEWS

Brazil's PCC Scared Rival Kingpin into Surrendering to Police

BRAZIL / 27 APR 2021 BY KATIE JONES EN

Fahd Jamil Georges, a veteran drug trafficker along the Paraguay-Brazil border, said he surrendered to authorities after being threatened by the PCC -- a reminder of how completely the Brazilian gang has come to rule this frontier.

The notorious Brazilian criminal, now 79, told a judge during a recent hearing that the First Capital Command (Primeiro Comando da Capital – PCC) had sent him threatening texts and that he feared for his life. In Ponta Porã, a Brazilian town on the Paraguay border, the PCC is "after me," he said, according to Campo Grande News citing Jamil's hearing.

Jamil, who surrendered to police in mid-April, faces a litany of charges related to organized crime, including drug trafficking, arms trafficking and corruption. He had been on the run since June 2020.

SEE ALSO: While Taking Paraguay-Brazil Border, PCC Tries to Control Its Own

In 2005, Jamil was sentenced to 20 years in prison for his involvement in international drug trafficking, money laundering and tax evasion. But he fled to Paraguay soon afterward. 

At his April 19 hearing, Jamil claimed that his poor health had also contributed to his decision to surrender.

InSight Crime Analysis

Though the septuagenarian trafficker is no longer as formidable as when he was known as the "King of the Border," Jamil being spooked by the PCC's threats is further evidence of the power the gang wields on the Brazil-Paraguay border.

Jamil was among the most wanted men in Brazil and beyond. In 2006, the United States added him to its Foreign Narcotics Kingpins list. Jamil also had links to a militia group in Brazil's Campo Grande, the capital of the border state of Mato Grosso do Sul, and he is accused of being an intellectual author in the 1991 killing of a Paraguayan journalist, Santiago Leguizamón.

Jamil, who presented himself in Paraguay as a wealthy property owner and horse-breeder, counted among his friends former Paraguay dictator Alfredo Stroessner and former President Andrés Rodríguez (1989-1993), according to Paraguayan media outlet Última Hora. Jamil also conducted business with former President Horacio Cartes (2013-2018), who admitted to receiving payments from Jamil.

SEE ALSO: First Capital Command – PCC Profile

But traffickers like Jamil have largely been sidelined by the PCC, which now controls much of the drug trade in the Paraguay-Brazil border region. The group maintains a strong presence in the eastern Paraguayan frontier cities of Pedro Juan Caballero, Capitán Bado, Salto del Guairá and Ciudad del Este.

The PCC has been able to take control of cross-border smuggling routes as part of its “Project Paraguay” strategy, which was reportedly hatched by its leaders as far back as 2010.

Prior to taking over the region, the gang had maintained an uneasy alliance with drug trafficker Jarvis Chimenes Pavão and Brazil's other major gang, the Red Command (Comando Vermelho – CV).

Pavão, who was once one of South America’s most prominent drug traffickers, formerly worked under the auspices of Jamil at the border. His downfall, like that of his mentor, paralleled the PCC's rise in the region.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

BRAZIL / 17 FEB 2017

Brazil's Supreme Court has ruled the state must compensate prisoners held in overcrowded conditions, in a decision that could lead…

ARGENTINA / 5 MAR 2020

In a year marked by political and criminal turmoil, Latin American capitals did not escape the effects of the violence,…

BRAZIL / 21 NOV 2011

Paraguayan officials have protested against Brazil’s police and military operations along the shared border, which aim to crack down…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Apure Investigation Makes Headlines

22 OCT 2021

InSight Crime’s investigation into the battle for the Venezuelan border state of Apure resonated in both Colombian and Venezuelan media. A dozen outlets picked up the report, including Venezuela’s…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Tackles Illegal Fishing

15 OCT 2021

In October, InSight Crime and American University’s Center for Latin American and Latino Studies (CLALS) began a year-long project on illegal, unreported, unregulated (IUU) fishing in…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Featured in Handbook for Reporting on Organized Crime

8 OCT 2021

In late September, the Global Investigative Journalism Network (GIJN) published an excerpt of its forthcoming guide on reporting organized crime in Indonesia.

THE ORGANIZATION

Probing Organized Crime in Haiti

1 OCT 2021

InSight Crime has made it a priority to investigate organized crime in Haiti, where an impotent state is reeling after the July assassination of President Jovenel Moïse, coupled with an…

THE ORGANIZATION

Emergency First Aid in Hostile Environments

24 SEP 2021

At InSight Crime's annual treat, we ramped up hostile environment and emergency first aid training for our 40-member staff, many of whom conduct on-the-ground investigations in dangerous corners of the region.