HomeNewsBriefAmnesty Warns of 700,000 Illegal Guns in Paraguay
BRIEF

Amnesty Warns of 700,000 Illegal Guns in Paraguay

ARMS TRAFFICKING / 17 APR 2012 BY TATIANA FARAMARZI EN

Amnesty International has called on the Paraguayan government to better regulate weapons, saying that there are a million weapons in civilian hands in the country and only a third are registered.

The global human rights organization called on Paraguayan authorities to adopt policies that will cut down armed violence in the impoverished country, where registration and regulation of firearms remains scant despite escalating guerrilla attacks, large-scale marijuana production, and arms smuggling into Brazil.

Amnesty International officials stated that Paraguay is not impervious to the problem presented by the global trade of illicit firearms, ABC reports. The organization maintained that illegal guns have become an ever-present element in Paraguayan society, posing a threat to citizen security that must be addressed.

According to National Police statistics gathered last year, Paraguay saw one gun-related death daily. The country’s Directorate of Military Equipment assessment shows that of the one million arms in civilian hands, only 30 percent are registered.

InSight Crime Analysis

Paraguay is an important site for the smuggling of weapons into Brazil. The Brazilian government has indicated that the majority of entry points for weapons moved illicitly into the country are on the Paraguayan border. One driver of this is Paraguay's lax gun regulations; arms are often smuggled into the country from Argentina and then on to Brazil.

Another factor that could be driving up the number of illegal weapons in Paraguay is the growing presence of Brazilian criminal groups. Drug gangs like Red Command (Comando Vermelho) have reportedly located themselves over the border, attracted by weaker law enforcement and by the chance to cut middlemen out of their trafficking deals.

Paraguay is also home to guerrilla group the Paraguayan People’s Army (EPP), which has launched several armed attacks on civilian as well as police targets in the last 12 months -- attacks like these, in rural areas where there is little state presence, contributes to a sense of insecurity in the country.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

ARMS TRAFFICKING / 22 AUG 2011

El Salvador's police reported that they had seized some 1,010 illegal firearms in the eastern part of the country…

ARMS TRAFFICKING / 4 AUG 2011

Police findings point to a link between a local Salvadoran gang, based in the center of the country east of…

ARMS TRAFFICKING / 23 AUG 2017

The weapons trade within Honduras is difficult to monitor. This is largely because the military, the country's sole importer,…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Apure Investigation Makes Headlines

22 OCT 2021

InSight Crime’s investigation into the battle for the Venezuelan border state of Apure resonated in both Colombian and Venezuelan media. A dozen outlets picked up the report, including Venezuela’s…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Tackles Illegal Fishing

15 OCT 2021

In October, InSight Crime and American University’s Center for Latin American and Latino Studies (CLALS) began a year-long project on illegal, unreported, unregulated (IUU) fishing in…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Featured in Handbook for Reporting on Organized Crime

8 OCT 2021

In late September, the Global Investigative Journalism Network (GIJN) published an excerpt of its forthcoming guide on reporting organized crime in Indonesia.

THE ORGANIZATION

Probing Organized Crime in Haiti

1 OCT 2021

InSight Crime has made it a priority to investigate organized crime in Haiti, where an impotent state is reeling after the July assassination of President Jovenel Moïse, coupled with an…

THE ORGANIZATION

Emergency First Aid in Hostile Environments

24 SEP 2021

At InSight Crime's annual treat, we ramped up hostile environment and emergency first aid training for our 40-member staff, many of whom conduct on-the-ground investigations in dangerous corners of the region.