HomeNewsBriefBolivian Government Identifies Source of 'Illegal' Coca
BRIEF

Bolivian Government Identifies Source of 'Illegal' Coca

BOLIVIA / 12 NOV 2010 BY INSIGHT CRIME EN

The Bolivian government announced on Monday that it has located the six regions in which most of the country’s legally-produced coca is diverted to the illegal drug trade, all of which are located in the central departments of La Paz, Cochabamba, and Santacruz and Tarija.

According to the business journal AméricaEconomía, Bolivian officials say that between 35 percent and 40 percent of the coca produced in the country is used for "the illegal trade,” while 65 percent is used for traditional consumption. Luis Cutipa, director of the Bolivian agency for coca regulation, blamed the illegal production on a lack of resources. “There are more than 11,000 coca producers nationwide,” the official reported, adding that this number was impossible to regulate with the number of government workers in his office. The announcement comes after the Morales administration expelled the US Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) from the country in 2008, cutting the South American nation off from significant amounts of anti-narcotics aid.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Tags

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

BOLIVIA / 1 MAR 2018

A recent eco-trafficking bust in Bolivia involving Chinese nationals demonstrates how the ongoing trade in exotic animal parts is being fueled…

BOLIVIA / 29 JUL 2019

Officials within the agency entrusted with protecting Bolivia's forests falsified data and provided documents legitimizing the illegal harvesting of timber,…

BOLIVIA / 22 SEP 2021

A heist of Brazilian planes that were later discovered in Bolivia has offered a unique look into how drug planes…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Tackles Illegal Fishing

15 OCT 2021

In October, InSight Crime and American University’s Center for Latin American and Latino Studies (CLALS) began a year-long project on illegal, unreported, unregulated (IUU) fishing in…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Featured in Handbook for Reporting on Organized Crime

8 OCT 2021

In late September, the Global Investigative Journalism Network (GIJN) published an excerpt of its forthcoming guide on reporting organized crime in Indonesia.

THE ORGANIZATION

Probing Organized Crime in Haiti

1 OCT 2021

InSight Crime has made it a priority to investigate organized crime in Haiti, where an impotent state is reeling after the July assassination of President Jovenel Moïse, coupled with an…

THE ORGANIZATION

Emergency First Aid in Hostile Environments

24 SEP 2021

At InSight Crime's annual treat, we ramped up hostile environment and emergency first aid training for our 40-member staff, many of whom conduct on-the-ground investigations in dangerous corners of the region.

THE ORGANIZATION

Series on Environmental Crime in the Amazon Generates Headlines

17 SEP 2021

InSight Crime and the Igarapé Institute have been delighted at the response to our joint investigation into environmental crimes in the Colombian Amazon. Coverage of our chapters dedicated to illegal mining…