HomeNewsBriefCan New Anti-Human Trafficking Body in Brazil Really Have Impact?
BRIEF

Can New Anti-Human Trafficking Body in Brazil Really Have Impact?

BRAZIL / 30 JAN 2014 BY MIRIAM WELLS EN

A national body to combat human trafficking has been set up in Brazil as part of a new strategy aimed at tackling the crime; but without much needed changes in the law, slave labor in the country will continue to flourish.

The National Committee to Combat Human Trafficking (Conatrap) will be formed of 26 members — 12 from the federal government, 12 from civil society and two regional government representatives, said a statement on the Ministry of Justice’s website. They will hold office for two years.

SEE ALSO: Coverage of Human Trafficking

Conatrap will be tasked with proposing new anti-trafficking initiatives, carrying out studies and monitoring the implementation of national anti-trafficking plans, reported Diario de Pernambuco.

InSight Crime Analysis

Conatrap is the latest initiative in the Brazilian government’s three year national plan against human trafficking which came into force early last year. In a country where as many as 200,000 people are estimated to be trapped in slavery, it is good news that the government is acknowledging that trafficking is a severe national problem, and some significant progress has been made. Last year, the first ever major study of trafficking across Brazil was carried out, and the numbers of reports of human trafficking rose a dramatic 1,500 percent. The government has also invested millions in creating new posts across the country to provide victims services.

However no amount of increased awareness, improved services or national committees are going to truly make a dent in this entrenched practice until the law creates serious deterrents for those engaging in it. The real issue is that extremely powerful interests widely use exploitative labor and have so far successfully prevented a change in the law that would really hit them hard — unsurprising in a country where corruption infiltrates the political and judicial system at every level.  The passage of a constitutional amendment that would allow for slaveholders’ property to be confiscated has been held up for more than ten years. If the newly-formed Conatrap really wants to make an impact, lobbying for this amendment to finally come into law would be an excellent start.

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Related Content

BRAZIL / 8 JAN 2018

A new war between Brazil’s two biggest crime groups has contributed to escalating violence across the country, which authorities are…

BRAZIL / 23 JAN 2013

Over 2,400 Brazilian prisoners escaped after being given leave to return home over the Christmas and New Year's Eve period,…

BRAZIL / 18 OCT 2011

Rio de Janeiro's public safety secretary talks about the future of the favela pacification scheme, the murder of a judge,…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Strategic Communications Manager Job Description

12 FEB 2021

InSight Crime is looking for a full-time strategic communications manager. This person needs to be able to work in a fast-paced world of daily news, high-profile investigations, national and international…

THE ORGANIZATION

We Have Updated Our Website

4 FEB 2021

Welcome to our new home page. We have revamped the site to create a better display and reader experience.

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Events – Border Crime: The Northern Triangle and Tri-Border Area

ARGENTINA / 25 JAN 2021

Through several rounds of extensive field investigations, our researchers have analyzed and mapped out the main illicit economies and criminal groups present in 39 border departments spread across the six countries of study – the Northern Triangle trio of Guatemala, Honduras, and El…

BRIEF

InSight Crime’s ‘Memo Fantasma’ Investigation Wins Simón Bolívar National Journalism Prize

COLOMBIA / 20 NOV 2020

The staff at InSight Crime was awarded the prestigious Simón Bolívar national journalism prize in Colombia for its two-year investigation into the drug trafficker known as “Memo Fantasma,” which was…

ANALYSIS

InSight Crime – From Uncovering Organized Crime to Finding What Works

COLOMBIA / 12 NOV 2020

This project began 10 years ago as an effort to address a problem: the lack of daily coverage, investigative stories and analysis of organized crime in the Americas. …