HomeNewsBriefMore Allegations Emerge Against Bolivian Ex-Police Chief
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More Allegations Emerge Against Bolivian Ex-Police Chief

BOLIVIA / 6 SEP 2011 BY GEOFFREY RAMSEY EN

A Bolivian politician claims that General Rene Sanabria, the jailed former anti-drug czar, incriminated former police chief Oscar Nina in dealing with drug traffickers.

As La Razon reports, congresswoman Jessica Echeverria has been in the United States following Sanabria's trial, and claimed to have had access to his case file. The general was arrested in Panama in February on drug charges, and subsequently extradited to the U.S.

According to Echeverria, Sanabria acknowledged that senior police commanders concealed drug shipments through the country in airports and along key border points. She also claimed that Sanabria has confirmed that the Sinaloa Cartel, run by Joaquin Guzman, alias “El Chapo,” operates in the country.

Echeverria did not provide many details on Sanabria’s file, but insinuated that it contained information linking his operations to former police chief General Oscar Nina. Similar allegations were put forth on September 1, in an investigative report by Univision.

Echeverria said that that the Univision data was accurate. "What is within this report shows how the police operate, as there were many cover-ups on many levels within the same operation," she said, calling on the government to investigate Nina.

The administration, for its part, has dismissed the allegations as an attempt by opposition politicians to smear President Evo Morales.

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