HomeNewsBriefNew Peru Human Smuggling Groups Points to New Migration Patterns
BRIEF

New Peru Human Smuggling Groups Points to New Migration Patterns

BRAZIL / 20 JUN 2014 BY KYRA GURNEY EN

Authorities in Peru have identified seven human trafficking groups responsible for smuggling undocumented migrants through the country and into Brazil, highlighting how the emergence of new migration patterns leads to the development of new criminal networks.  

Peru's national police have revealed that there are three criminal groups dedicated to smuggling illegal migrants into the country from Ecuador and another four operating in the Madre de Dios region on the border with Brazil, reported El Comercio

Most of the illegal migrants moving through the country come from Haiti and travel to the Dominican Republic by land before flying into Ecuador, which does not require Haitians to obtain a visa. From there, migrants hire smugglers to take them across the border into Peru. 

Although smugglers often promise to transport migrants all the way to Brazil, many are abandoned along the way. 

Between January 1 and June 18 this year, police detained 580 Haitian migrants in Peru, although according to official figures this number only represents ten percent of the Haitians who illegally entered the country during the same period, reported El Comercio. In total, Peruvian officials believe more than 12,000 Haitians have traveled through Peru to the Madre de Dios region since May 2011.

In addition to Haitians, substantial numbers of Senegalese and Nepalese migrants are also traveling across Peru on the way to Brazil.

InSight Crime Analysis

Haiti's 2010 earthquake destroyed the country's infrastructure and propelled thousands to seek better opportunities abroad, with over 15,000 migrating to other parts of Latin America between 2010 and 2012 alone, by some estimates.

Attracted by the country's growing economic power, undocumented immigrants from countries such as Haiti have poured into Brazil, with over 5,000 entering the Amazon state of Acre -- via Bolivia and Peru -- in a period of just a few weeks in April 2013. 

SEE ALSO: Peru News and Profiles

Police investigations in Peru illustrate the criminal networks that have sprung up around migration routes through the country, charging between $100 and $200 a person to smuggle migrants across the border from Ecuador. 

The migration route to Brazil also reflects the effects of economic changes on regional migration patterns, which were previously dominated by travel northward to the United States.

According to the US Department of Homeland Security, the number of undocumented immigrants entering the United States decreased significantly between 2005 and 2010, likely partly because of the country's economic recession. Immigrants now appear to be turning towards other new economic powerhouses like Brazil, and human smuggling rings are springing up to meet the demand.     

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

BRAZIL / 7 MAY 2021

The stranger burst into the house, staggering and leaving a trail of blood behind him. He ran into the back,…

BRAZIL / 14 SEP 2021

South Africa has made a rapid succession of large cocaine seizures in recent months, illuminating how the country and region…

BRAZIL / 5 SEP 2022

Brazil's city of Rio de Janeiro is suffering a major security crisis, as gender and religion affect organized crime in…

About InSight Crime

WORK WITH US

Open Position: Full Stack WordPress Developer

28 NOV 2022

As Full Stack WordPress Developer You Will: Work collaboratively with other developers and designers to maintain and improve organizational standards.Demonstrate a high level of attention to detail, and implement best…

THE ORGANIZATION

Join Us This #GivingTuesday in Exposing Organized Crime

24 NOV 2022

For over twelve years, InSight Crime has contributed to the global dialogue on organized crime and corruption. Our work has provided policymakers, analysts, academics, journalists, and the general public with…

THE ORGANIZATION

Like Crime, Our Coverage Knows No Borders

18 NOV 2022

The nature of global organized crime means that while InSight Crime focuses on Latin America, we also follow criminal dynamics worldwide. InSight Crime investigator Alessandro Ford covers the connections between Latin American and European…

THE ORGANIZATION

Using Data to Expose Crime

11 NOV 2022

Co-director Jeremy McDermott made a virtual presentation at a conference hosted by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC). The ‘Sixth International Conference on Governance, Crime, and Justice…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime ON AIR

4 NOV 2022

InSight Crime Co-director Steven Dudley was interviewed for the podcast The Rosenberg Case: A Tale of Murder, Corruption, and Conspiracy in Guatemala, which explores the potential involvement of then president, Álvaro Colom,…