HomeNewsBriefNew Peru Human Smuggling Groups Points to New Migration Patterns
BRIEF

New Peru Human Smuggling Groups Points to New Migration Patterns

BRAZIL / 20 JUN 2014 BY KYRA GURNEY EN

Authorities in Peru have identified seven human trafficking groups responsible for smuggling undocumented migrants through the country and into Brazil, highlighting how the emergence of new migration patterns leads to the development of new criminal networks.  

Peru's national police have revealed that there are three criminal groups dedicated to smuggling illegal migrants into the country from Ecuador and another four operating in the Madre de Dios region on the border with Brazil, reported El Comercio

Most of the illegal migrants moving through the country come from Haiti and travel to the Dominican Republic by land before flying into Ecuador, which does not require Haitians to obtain a visa. From there, migrants hire smugglers to take them across the border into Peru. 

Although smugglers often promise to transport migrants all the way to Brazil, many are abandoned along the way. 

Between January 1 and June 18 this year, police detained 580 Haitian migrants in Peru, although according to official figures this number only represents ten percent of the Haitians who illegally entered the country during the same period, reported El Comercio. In total, Peruvian officials believe more than 12,000 Haitians have traveled through Peru to the Madre de Dios region since May 2011.

In addition to Haitians, substantial numbers of Senegalese and Nepalese migrants are also traveling across Peru on the way to Brazil.

InSight Crime Analysis

Haiti's 2010 earthquake destroyed the country's infrastructure and propelled thousands to seek better opportunities abroad, with over 15,000 migrating to other parts of Latin America between 2010 and 2012 alone, by some estimates.

Attracted by the country's growing economic power, undocumented immigrants from countries such as Haiti have poured into Brazil, with over 5,000 entering the Amazon state of Acre -- via Bolivia and Peru -- in a period of just a few weeks in April 2013. 

SEE ALSO: Peru News and Profiles

Police investigations in Peru illustrate the criminal networks that have sprung up around migration routes through the country, charging between $100 and $200 a person to smuggle migrants across the border from Ecuador. 

The migration route to Brazil also reflects the effects of economic changes on regional migration patterns, which were previously dominated by travel northward to the United States.

According to the US Department of Homeland Security, the number of undocumented immigrants entering the United States decreased significantly between 2005 and 2010, likely partly because of the country's economic recession. Immigrants now appear to be turning towards other new economic powerhouses like Brazil, and human smuggling rings are springing up to meet the demand.     

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

BOLIVIA / 3 JAN 2018

Cocaine is one of the world’s most in-demand drugs. Its production center is in the Andean region of Colombia, Peru…

BOLIVIA / 20 DEC 2012

Bolivia's anti-narcotics agency announced it has seized ten planes and destroyed 10 clandestine landing strips so far this year, indication…

BOLIVIA / 19 MAR 2015

An investigation into Brazil's massive contraband trade highlights the scope of the problem and the modus operandi of smuggling networks…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Tackles Illegal Fishing

15 OCT 2021

In October, InSight Crime and American University’s Center for Latin American and Latino Studies (CLALS) began a year-long project on illegal, unreported, unregulated (IUU) fishing in…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Featured in Handbook for Reporting on Organized Crime

8 OCT 2021

In late September, the Global Investigative Journalism Network (GIJN) published an excerpt of its forthcoming guide on reporting organized crime in Indonesia.

THE ORGANIZATION

Probing Organized Crime in Haiti

1 OCT 2021

InSight Crime has made it a priority to investigate organized crime in Haiti, where an impotent state is reeling after the July assassination of President Jovenel Moïse, coupled with an…

THE ORGANIZATION

Emergency First Aid in Hostile Environments

24 SEP 2021

At InSight Crime's annual treat, we ramped up hostile environment and emergency first aid training for our 40-member staff, many of whom conduct on-the-ground investigations in dangerous corners of the region.

THE ORGANIZATION

Series on Environmental Crime in the Amazon Generates Headlines

17 SEP 2021

InSight Crime and the Igarapé Institute have been delighted at the response to our joint investigation into environmental crimes in the Colombian Amazon. Coverage of our chapters dedicated to illegal mining…