HomeNewsBrief'Police Behind 100 Disappearances in Guerrero, Mexico'
BRIEF

'Police Behind 100 Disappearances in Guerrero, Mexico'

HUMAN RIGHTS / 20 JAN 2015 BY DAVID GAGNE EN

Authorities have reported at least 100 disappearances involving police in the southwest state of Guerrero, Mexico, an indication that the abduction of over 40 students last year, which caused international outrage, was anything but an isolated case.

According to Mexico's Attorney General's Office (PGR), local police kidnapped no less than 100 people over the last two years in Guerrero, including students, women, children, and an African priest, reported Vanguardia. In many instances, police collaborated with criminal groups, according to Vanguardia.

Some of the enforced disappearances ended in murder. Authorities told 24 Horas that reasons for the disappearances included the collection of ransom and extortion fees, as well as victims being killed after they were robbed or subjected to some other crime.

The PGR missing persons unit currently has investigations open for 621 victims of enforced disappearance throughout the country, reported Milenio.

InSight Crime Analysis

As noted by 24 Horas, the key role that local police played in the disappearance and reported massacre of over 40 students last year has drawn attention to the apparent systematic use of enforced disappearance by police not just in Guerrero, but across Mexico. (For a full recap of the missing students case, click through the timeline below.) It is possible that this increased attention on Guerrero may bring some cases involving disappearances to a satisfactory resolution. At least five police officers in Guerrero have reportedly already been convicted of involvement in the disappearance of 12 people, and several more arrest warrants will be issued in the coming weeks, according to 24 Horas.

The high number of disappearances involving Guerrero police highlights another unsettling phenomenon: the deep penetration of criminal groups such as the Guerreros Unidos into Mexican law enforcement. Much of Mexico's police corruption is concentrated in areas where there is a high presence of organized crime groups, as low police salaries often makes the prospect of working alongside criminal groups a difficult proposition for many officers to pass up. 

SEE ALSO: Mexico News and Profiles

For years, Mexico has struggled to reign in its rate of forced disappearances. In 2013, Mexico's human rights ombudsman announced authorities reported over 26,000 people went missing during the administration of former President Felipe Calderon. International NGOs have also documented the involvement of Mexican security forces in a large percentage of enforced disappearances in the country. 

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

MEXICO / 12 JUL 2011

A freshly leaked internal FBI memo provides insight into attempts by Mexican drug gang the Zetas to tighten their hold…

MEXICO / 13 SEP 2011

Mexico's arrest of 80 alleged Zetas, and confiscation of a wealth of high-tech communications material in…

MEXICO / 20 APR 2012

A new report by the UN High Commissioner for Refugees says 160,000 people were internally displaced in Mexico last year,…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Guatemala Social Insecurity Investigation Makes Front Page News

10 DEC 2021

InSight Crime’s latest investigation into a case of corruption within Guatemala's social security agency linked to the deaths of patients with kidney disease made waves in…

THE ORGANIZATION

Venezuela El Dorado Investigation Makes Headlines

3 DEC 2021

InSight Crime's investigation into the trafficking of illegal gold in Venezuela's Amazon region generated impact on both social media and in the press. Besides being republished and mentioned by several…

THE ORGANIZATION

Gender and Investigative Techniques Focus of Workshops

26 NOV 2021

On November 23-24, InSight Crime conducted a workshop called “How to Cover Organized Crime: Investigation Techniques and A Focus on Gender.” The session convened reporters and investigators from a dozen…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Names Two New Board Members

19 NOV 2021

In recent weeks, InSight Crime added two new members to its board. Joy Olson is the former executive director of the Washington Office on Latin America…

THE ORGANIZATION

Senate Commission in Paraguay Cites InSight Crime

12 NOV 2021

InSight Crime’s reporting and investigations often reach the desks of diplomats, security officials and politicians. The latest example occurred in late October during a commission of Paraguay's Senate that tackled…