HomeNewsBriefHonduras Removes Police Director Amid Stalled Reform Effort
BRIEF

Honduras Removes Police Director Amid Stalled Reform Effort

HONDURAS / 27 NOV 2014 BY KYRA GURNEY EN

Honduras’ president has replaced the head of the country’s police force, amid speculation that his decision was motivated by the former director’s opposition to militarizing security and his failure to purge the police force.

The Honduran Security Ministry announced the removal of former police director Ramon Sabillon on November 20, reported El Heraldo. President Juan Orlando Hernandez said Sabillon was replaced as part of a general reorganization of the security forces, but according to El Heraldo there are reports he was fired for opposing the government’s reliance on the military to fight crime, and delaying police reform.

According to Security Minister Arturo Corrales, Hernandez met with the police leadership — including the new police director  Felix Villanueva — on November 25 and ordered them to “accelerate the purging” of the police force, reported AFP.

InSight Crime Analysis

If Hernandez did replace the former police director because of his failure to purge the police force, his removal could be a positive sign that Honduras is taking police reform seriously.

The country’s police have been accused of widespread corruption and human rights abuses. According to AFP, the Attorney General’s Office revealed in 2011 that entire police units were involved in organized crime. That same year, the vice president of the Honduran Congress said that up to 40 percent of police officers were involved in criminal activity.

SEE ALSO: Honduras News and Profiles

In early 2012, the Honduran government ordered the unit that investigates and evaluates police officers (DIECP) to purge the police force, but the process has produced few results. According to AFP, efforts to reform the police have been criticized for not resulting in the removal of high-ranking police suspected of corruption and embezzlement.   

Meanwhile, President Hernandez has controversially pushed for the militarization of public security by expanding the role of the Military Police of Public Order (PMOP), to which he plans to add 1,000 new officers. Hernandez has also asked Congress to enshrine the military police in the constitution. 

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Related Content

BARRIO 18 / 12 JUL 2013

El Salvador and Honduras are pioneering new efforts to stop gang-related violence via truces, but there are some critical differences…

CARIBBEAN / 20 APR 2012

As the US Coast Guard intercepts a drug-smuggling submarine in the Caribbean, the 30th such vessel intercepted since 2006, Southern Command…

GUATEMALA / 30 APR 2014

A recent news report discusses the increasing prominence of lynchings, illegal detentions by mobs and other instances of popular justice…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Strategic Communications Manager Job Description

12 FEB 2021

InSight Crime is looking for a full-time strategic communications manager. This person needs to be able to work in a fast-paced world of daily news, high-profile investigations, national and international…

THE ORGANIZATION

We Have Updated Our Website

4 FEB 2021

Welcome to our new home page. We have revamped the site to create a better display and reader experience.

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Events – Border Crime: The Northern Triangle and Tri-Border Area

ARGENTINA / 25 JAN 2021

Through several rounds of extensive field investigations, our researchers have analyzed and mapped out the main illicit economies and criminal groups present in 39 border departments spread across the six countries of study – the Northern Triangle trio of Guatemala, Honduras, and El…

BRIEF

InSight Crime’s ‘Memo Fantasma’ Investigation Wins Simón Bolívar National Journalism Prize

COLOMBIA / 20 NOV 2020

The staff at InSight Crime was awarded the prestigious Simón Bolívar national journalism prize in Colombia for its two-year investigation into the drug trafficker known as “Memo Fantasma,” which was…

ANALYSIS

InSight Crime – From Uncovering Organized Crime to Finding What Works

COLOMBIA / 12 NOV 2020

This project began 10 years ago as an effort to address a problem: the lack of daily coverage, investigative stories and analysis of organized crime in the Americas. …