HomeNewsBriefHonduras Sees Slight Drop in 2013 Murders
BRIEF

Honduras Sees Slight Drop in 2013 Murders

HOMICIDES / 26 JUL 2013 BY MARGUERITE CAWLEY EN

According to the latest figures, the number of murders in Honduras during the first half of 2013 has fallen, but not by enough to make a dent in Honduras' reputation as the world's most dangerous country.

According to the figures collected by the National Autonomous University of Honduras, there were 2,929 murders during the first five months of 2013 -- 3.7 percent less than the 3,043 killings registered over the same period in 2012.

The coordinator of the University's Violence Observatory, Migdonia Ayestas, said that some days there were up to 40 violent deaths nationwide, and that the average number was 20 per day, reported La Prensa.

In Tegucigalpa, the Observatory recorded 16 homicide-free days thus far in 2013. The military recorded slightly fewer homicide-free days in the capital: nine.

According to the Observatory's count, there have been just two murder-free days this year in San Pedro Sula -- ranked the world's murder capital for the last two years -- while Honduras' military counted three, reported El Heraldo. 

InSight Crime Analysis

The University's Violence Observatory had previously predicted that by the end of 2013, the murder rate would drop six percent when compared to 2012, although this was based more on population growth than a reduction in violence. While any reduction in the number of murders in Honduras is welcome, a small reduction on 2012 -- the most violent on record -- does little to disguise the continuing crisis in the country. 

As part of its anti-crime strategy, the Honduran government has deployed army patrols to the streets in the most dangerous parts of Tegucigalpa and San Pedro Sula. The military claims this has had a dramatic effect on crime levels in San Pedro Sula, even while providing somewhat imprecise statistics.

Both Tegucigalpa and San Pedro Sula are important centers of gang activity, one significant contributor to the country's violence. It is still unclear what effect, if any, a gang ceasefire announced in late May -- apparently modeled after El Salvador's gang truce -- will have on violence levels.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

EL SALVADOR / 23 MAR 2017

A US senator has warned Guatemala that aid funding could be put in jeopardy if the Central American country's…

BELTRAN LEYVA ORG / 17 APR 2017

The Mexican government's recently released list of cities with the highest number of murders under President Enrique Peña Nieto's tenure…

BARRIO 18 / 12 JUL 2013

El Salvador and Honduras are pioneering new efforts to stop gang-related violence via truces, but there are some critical differences…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Apure Investigation Makes Headlines

22 OCT 2021

InSight Crime’s investigation into the battle for the Venezuelan border state of Apure resonated in both Colombian and Venezuelan media. A dozen outlets picked up the report, including Venezuela’s…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Tackles Illegal Fishing

15 OCT 2021

In October, InSight Crime and American University’s Center for Latin American and Latino Studies (CLALS) began a year-long project on illegal, unreported, unregulated (IUU) fishing in…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Featured in Handbook for Reporting on Organized Crime

8 OCT 2021

In late September, the Global Investigative Journalism Network (GIJN) published an excerpt of its forthcoming guide on reporting organized crime in Indonesia.

THE ORGANIZATION

Probing Organized Crime in Haiti

1 OCT 2021

InSight Crime has made it a priority to investigate organized crime in Haiti, where an impotent state is reeling after the July assassination of President Jovenel Moïse, coupled with an…

THE ORGANIZATION

Emergency First Aid in Hostile Environments

24 SEP 2021

At InSight Crime's annual treat, we ramped up hostile environment and emergency first aid training for our 40-member staff, many of whom conduct on-the-ground investigations in dangerous corners of the region.