HomeNewsBriefMexico Reports Drop in Crime-Related Homicides
BRIEF

Mexico Reports Drop in Crime-Related Homicides

HOMICIDES / 12 JUL 2013 BY MARGUERITE CAWLEY EN

Organized crime-related homicides in Mexico dropped during the first seven months of the new administration, according to various counts, though it is unclear whether this is representative of a wider trend.

According to numbers from the Interior Ministry (SEGOB), 869 homicides "related to federal crimes" were registered from June 1 through June 30, compared to 955 such homicides in the same period of 2012, reported Animal Politico -- a nine percent drop. June was the third consecutive month in which the government registered under 1,000 crime-related homicides, reported Excelsior.

Looking at the first seven months of President Enrique Peña Nieto's administration, officially reported organized crime-related homicides were down to 7,110 compared to 8,631 during the same period the year before, representing an 18 percent drop, according to Animal Politico. El Informador reported this number as 6,165, and El Universal as 7,128, but is was unclear where any of these media had sourced their "official" figures.

In breaking down the June numbers, SEGOB claimed that 96 percent of those murdered were criminals, "presumably responsible for illegal acts." SEGOB also reported that 1,096 alleged criminals were captured during June.

InSight Crime Analysis

Peña Nieto has -- at least vocally -- made violence reduction and crime prevention a key element of his security strategy, differentiating himself from predecessor Felipe Calderon, who focused on targeting criminal kingpins. However, this year's organized crime related pre-election violence was poor publicity for the president, and led to accusations that his party was once again forming alliances with organized crime.

As observed by analyst Alejandro Hope, Mexican homicide numbers are not straightforward, making it difficult to analyze trends. For one thing, the manner in which the government determines whether a homicide is "related to organized crime" is based on subjective interpretations of factors such as the type of weapon used. In addition, the variation in numbers released by different government bodies and independent sources raises questions about the accuracy of counts, particularly regarding "organized crime-related" homicides.

Government labeling of nearly all June victims as believed criminals is typical of both the present and former administrations, which have been criticized for quickly accusing victims of links to illegal activities, while failing to fully investigate the murders. 

"The authorities condemn murdered people, converting them into criminals, without offering the least evidence," wrote the editors of newspaper Vanguardia, after one of their photographers was accused of having links to drug traffickers after his body was found dismembered on the street.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

KNIGHTS TEMPLAR / 12 AUG 2013

From its origins as a breakaway faction of the battered La Familia Michoacana, the quirky Knights Templar of the Pacific…

BELTRAN LEYVA ORG / 6 DEC 2010

A U.S. government cable, reprinted in full here, from the U.S. Embassy in Mexico and various Washington government…

BELTRAN LEYVA ORG / 20 OCT 2014

Authorities in Mexico have captured an alleged leader of the criminal group Guerreros Unidos, who have been accused of collaborating…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Guatemala Social Insecurity Investigation Makes Front Page News

10 DEC 2021

InSight Crime’s latest investigation into a case of corruption within Guatemala's social security agency linked to the deaths of patients with kidney disease made waves in…

THE ORGANIZATION

Venezuela El Dorado Investigation Makes Headlines

3 DEC 2021

InSight Crime's investigation into the trafficking of illegal gold in Venezuela's Amazon region generated impact on both social media and in the press. Besides being republished and mentioned by several…

THE ORGANIZATION

Gender and Investigative Techniques Focus of Workshops

26 NOV 2021

On November 23-24, InSight Crime conducted a workshop called “How to Cover Organized Crime: Investigation Techniques and A Focus on Gender.” The session convened reporters and investigators from a dozen…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Names Two New Board Members

19 NOV 2021

In recent weeks, InSight Crime added two new members to its board. Joy Olson is the former executive director of the Washington Office on Latin America…

THE ORGANIZATION

Senate Commission in Paraguay Cites InSight Crime

12 NOV 2021

InSight Crime’s reporting and investigations often reach the desks of diplomats, security officials and politicians. The latest example occurred in late October during a commission of Paraguay's Senate that tackled…